Breast Cancer News 4 Types Of Essays

1. Wagner FB. History of breast disease and its treatment. In: Bland KI, editor; Copeland EM, editor. The Breast—Comprehensive Management of Benign and Malignant Diseases. Philadelphia: WB Saunders; 1998. pp. 1–16.

2. Lerner B. Inventing a curable disease: breast cancer control after World War II. In: Lerner B, editor. The Breast Cancer Wars: Fear, Hope, and the Pursuit of a Cure in Twentieth-Century America. Oxford: Oxford University Press, Inc.; 2001. pp. 41–68. [PubMed]

3. Ross W. Halfway to victory. In: Ross W, editor. Crusade: The Official History of the American Cancer Society. New York: Arbor House; 1987. p. 3.

4. Batt S. Patient No More: The Politics of Breast Cancer. Chartottetown, PEI, Canada: Gynergy Books; 1994. “Perfect People”: cancer charities; pp. 215–216.

5. Ross W. Transformation. In: Ross W, editor. Crusade: The Official History of the American Cancer Society. New York: Arbor House; 1987. pp. 34–35.

6. Ross W. Transformation. In: Ross W, editor. Crusade: The Official History of the American Cancer Society. New York: Arbor House; 1987. p. 33.

7. Boehmer U. A History of AIDS and breast cancer activism. In: Boehmer U, editor. The Personal and the Political: Women's Activism in Response to the Breast Cancer and AIDS Epidemics. Albany: State University of New York Press; 2000. pp. 8–9.

8. Lerner B. Inventing a curable disease: breast cancer control after World War II. In: Lerner B, editor. The Breast Cancer Wars: Fear, Hope, and the Pursuit of a Cure in Twentieth-Century America. Oxford: Oxford University Press, Inc.; 2001. p. 50. [PubMed]

9. Lerner B. “I alone am in charge of my body”: breast cancer patients in revolt. In: Lerner B, editor. The Breast Cancer Wars: Fear, Hope, and the Pursuit of a Cure in Twentieth-Century America. Oxford: Oxford University Press, Inc.; 2001. pp. 143–144. [PubMed]

10. Ross W. Reach to recovery. In: Ross W, editor. Crusade: The Official History of the American Cancer Society. New York: Arbor House; 1987. pp. 161–71.

11. Leopold E. Breast cancer within the history of the women's health movement. In: Leopold E, editor. A Darker Ribbon: Breast Cancer, Women, and Their Doctors in the Twentieth Century. Boston: Beacon Press; 1999. pp. 188–214.

12. Friedan B. The Feminine Mystique. New York: W. W. Norton & Company; 1963.

13. Boston Women's Health Book Collective. Our Bodies, Ourselves. New York: Simon & Schuster; 1971.

14. Gillon S. Olaquera N. The “second stage” and other struggles for women. In: Gillon S, editor; Olaquera N, editor. Boomer Nation: The Largest and Richest Generation Ever, and How It Changed America. New York: Free Press; 2004. pp. 191–211.

15. Crile G. What Women Should Know about the Breast Cancer Controversy. New York: Macmillan; 1973.

16. Campion R. The Invisible Worm. New York: Macmillan; 1972.

17. Lerner B. “I alone am in charge of my body“: breast cancer patients in revolt. In: Lerner B, editor. The Breast Cancer Wars: Fear, Hope, and the Pursuit of a Cure in Twentieth-Century America. Oxford: Oxford Press, Inc.; 2001. pp. 151–158.

18. Black S. Don't sit home and be afraid. McCall's Magazine. 1973;82:114–116.

19. Lerner B. No shrinking violet: Rose Kushner and the maturation of breast cancer activism. In: Lerner B, editor. The Breast Cancer Wars: Fear, Hope, and the Pursuit of a Cure in Twentieth-Century America. Oxford: Oxford Press, Inc.; 2001. pp. 170–171.

20. Olson J. Out of the closet: breast cancer in the 1970s. In: Olson J, editor. Bathsheba's Breast: Women, Cancer and History. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press; 2002. pp. 132–134.

21. Lerner B. No shrinking violet: Rose Kushner and the maturation of breast cancer activism. In: Lerner B, editor. The Breast Cancer Wars: Fear, Hope, and the Pursuit of a Cure in Twentieth-Century America. Oxford: Oxford University Press; 2001. p. 173.

22. Rollin B. First You Cry. Philadelphia: Lippincott; 1976.

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There are many types of breast cancer. The most common types are ductal carcinoma in situ, invasive ductal carcinoma, and invasive lobular carcinoma.

The type of breast cancer is determined by the specific cells in the breast that are affected. Most breast cancers are carcinomas. Carcinomas are tumors that start in the epithelial cells that line organs and tissues throughout the body. Sometimes, an even more specific term is used. For example, most breast cancers are a type of carcinoma called adenocarcinoma, which starts in cells that make up glands (glandular tissue). Breast adenocarcinomas start in the ducts (the milk ducts) or the lobules (milk-producing glands).

There are other, less common, types of breast cancers, too, such as sarcomas, phyllodes, Paget disease, and angiosarcomas which start in the cells of the muscle, fat, or connective tissue.

Sometimes a single breast tumor can be a combination of different types. And in some very rare types of breast cancer, the cancer cells may not form a lump or tumor at all.

When a biopsy is done to find out the specific type of breast cancer, the pathologist will also check if the cancer has spread into the surrounding tissues. The following terms are used to describe the extent of the cancer:  

  • In situ breast cancers have not spread.
  • Invasive or infiltrating cancers have  spread (invaded) into the surrounding breast tissue.

Common kinds of breast cancer

The most common kinds of breast cancer are carcinomas, and are named based on where they form and how far they have spread.

These general kinds of breast cancer below can be further described with the terms outlined above.

In situ cancers

Ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS; also known as intraductal carcinoma) is a non-invasive or pre-invasive breast cancer. See Ductal Carcinoma in Situ (DCIS) for more information.

Lobular carcinoma in situ (LCIS) may also be called lobular neoplasia. This breast change is not a cancer, though the name can be confusing. In LCIS, cells that look like cancer cells are growing in the lobules of the milk-producing glands of the breast, but they don’t grow through the wall of the lobules. See Lobular Carcinoma in Situ (LCIS) for more information.

Invasive (infiltrating) breast cancer

Breast cancers that have spread into surrounding breast tissue are known as invasive breast cancer. There are many different kinds of invasive breast cancer, but the most common are called invasive ductal carcinoma and invasive lobular carcinoma. See Invasive Breast Cancer for more information.

Less common types of breast cancer

Inflammatory breast cancer

Inflammatory breast cancer is an uncommon type of invasive breast cancer. It accounts for about 1% to 5% of all breast cancers.

Paget disease of the nipple

Paget disease of the nipple starts in the breast ducts and spreads to the skin of the nipple and then to the areola(the dark circle around the nipple). It is rare, accounting for only about 1-3% of all cases of breast cancer.

Phyllodes tumor

Phyllodes tumors are rare breast tumors. They develop in the connective tissue (stroma) of the breast, in contrast to carcinomas, which develop in the ducts or lobules. Most are benign, but there are others that are malignant (cancer). See Phyllodes Tumors of the Breastfor more information.

Angiosarcoma

Sarcomas of the breast are rare making up less than 1% of all breast cancers. Angiosarcoma starts in cells that line blood vessels or lymph vessels. It can involve the breast tissue or the skin of the breast. Some may be related to prior radiation therapy in that area. 

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