Emotion Emotion Emotion Essay Essay H Pod Theory Theory

Analysis and Evaluation of the Types of Emotion Essay

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Introduction
The purpose of this paper is to provide an analysis and evaluation of the Types of Emotion from the scientific/empirical and Islamic perspectives. The paper presumes that the readers are familiar with the content of the topic in question based on the introductory Psychology textbook by Ciccarelli and White (2010). Therefore, this paper will focus more the analysis and evaluation, rather than the description and details of the topic.
Types of Emotion
An emotion is experienced as a feeling that motivates, organizes, and guides perception, thought, and action (Izard, 1991). Emotions can be classified into three major categories which are: (1) the physiology of emotion, (2) the behaviour of emotion, and (3) the subjective…show more content…

Introduction
The purpose of this paper is to provide an analysis and evaluation of the Types of Emotion from the scientific/empirical and Islamic perspectives. The paper presumes that the readers are familiar with the content of the topic in question based on the introductory Psychology textbook by Ciccarelli and White (2010). Therefore, this paper will focus more the analysis and evaluation, rather than the description and details of the topic.
Types of Emotion
An emotion is experienced as a feeling that motivates, organizes, and guides perception, thought, and action (Izard, 1991). Emotions can be classified into three major categories which are: (1) the physiology of emotion, (2) the behaviour of emotion, and (3) the subjective experience of emotion (Ciccarelli & White, 2010; Kagan, 2007).
Physiology of Emotion
When one experiences an emotion, they would be physically aroused. This arousal is created by the sympathetic nervous system (Ciccarelli & White, 2010). Emotions are manifested in both the outward bodily reactions as well as the inner biological and physiological reactions. Ekman (1980) stated that different emotions produce different facial expressions (as cited in Ciccarelli & White, 2010). However these facial expressions may be misread and misinterpreted. This is especially the case across cultures. According to Levenson (1992), the physiological reactions however, are more easily distinguishable than the outward bodily reactions (as cited in Ciccarelli &

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