The Garden Of Love Essay For Her

  • English Standard Version
  • King James Version

1For I do not want you to be unaware, brothers, that our fathers were all under the cloud, and all passed through the sea,2and all were baptized into Moses in the cloud and in the sea,3and all ate the same spiritual food,4and all drank the same spiritual drink. For they drank from the spiritual Rock that followed them, and the Rock was Christ.5Nevertheless, with most of them God was not pleased, for they were overthrown in the wilderness.6Now these things took place as examples for us, that we might not desire evil as they did.7Do not be idolaters as some of them were; as it is written, The people sat down to eat and drink and rose up to play.8We must not indulge in sexual immorality as some of them did, and twenty-three thousand fell in a single day.9We must not put Christ to the test, as some of them did and were destroyed by serpents,10nor grumble, as some of them did and were destroyed by the Destroyer.11Now these things happened to them as an example, but they were written down for our instruction, on whom the end of the ages has come.12Therefore let anyone who thinks that he stands take heed lest he fall.13No temptation has overtaken you that is not common to man. God is faithful, and he will not let you be tempted beyond your ability, but with the temptation he will also provide the way of escape, that you may be able to endure it.14Therefore, my beloved, flee from idolatry.15I speak as to sensible people; judge for yourselves what I say.16The cup of blessing that we bless, is it not a participation in the blood of Christ? The bread that we break, is it not a participation in the body of Christ?17Because there is one bread, we who are many are one body, for we all partake of the one bread.18Consider the people of Israel: are not those who eat the sacrifices participants in the altar?19What do I imply then? That food offered to idols is anything, or that an idol is anything?20No, I imply that what pagans sacrifice they offer to demons and not to God. I do not want you to be participants with demons.21You cannot drink the cup of the Lord and the cup of demons. You cannot partake of the table of the Lord and the table of demons.22Shall we provoke the Lord to jealousy? Are we stronger than he?23All things are lawful, but not all things are helpful. All things are lawful, but not all things build up.24Let no one seek his own good, but the good of his neighbor.25Eat whatever is sold in the meat market without raising any question on the ground of conscience.26For the earth is the Lord's, and the fullness thereof.27If one of the unbelievers invites you to dinner and you are disposed to go, eat whatever is set before you without raising any question on the ground of conscience.28But if someone says to you, This has been offered in sacrifice, then do not eat it, for the sake of the one who informed you, and for the sake of conscience - 29I do not mean your conscience, but his. For why should my liberty be determined by someone else's conscience?30If I partake with thankfulness, why am I denounced because of that for which I give thanks?31So, whether you eat or drink, or whatever you do, do all to the glory of God.32Give no offense to Jews or to Greeks or to the church of God,33just as I try to please everyone in everything I do, not seeking my own advantage, but that of many, that they may be saved.

1Moreover, brethren, I would not that ye should be ignorant, how that all our fathers were under the cloud, and all passed through the sea;2And were all baptized unto Moses in the cloud and in the sea;3And did all eat the same spiritual meat;4And did all drink the same spiritual drink: for they drank of that spiritual Rock that followed them: and that Rock was Christ.5But with many of them God was not well pleased: for they were overthrown in the wilderness.6Now these things were our examples, to the intent we should not lust after evil things, as they also lusted.7Neither be ye idolaters, as were some of them; as it is written, The people sat down to eat and drink, and rose up to play.8Neither let us commit fornication, as some of them committed, and fell in one day three and twenty thousand.9Neither let us tempt Christ, as some of them also tempted, and were destroyed of serpents.10Neither murmur ye, as some of them also murmured, and were destroyed of the destroyer.11Now all these things happened unto them for ensamples: and they are written for our admonition, upon whom the ends of the world are come.12Wherefore let him that thinketh he standeth take heed lest he fall.13There hath no temptation taken you but such as is common to man: but God is faithful, who will not suffer you to be tempted above that ye are able; but will with the temptation also make a way to escape, that ye may be able to bear it.14Wherefore, my dearly beloved, flee from idolatry.15I speak as to wise men; judge ye what I say.16The cup of blessing which we bless, is it not the communion of the blood of Christ? The bread which we break, is it not the communion of the body of Christ?17For we being many are one bread, and one body: for we are all partakers of that one bread.18Behold Israel after the flesh: are not they which eat of the sacrifices partakers of the altar?19What say I then? that the idol is any thing, or that which is offered in sacrifice to idols is any thing?20But I say, that the things which the Gentiles sacrifice, they sacrifice to devils, and not to God: and I would not that ye should have fellowship with devils.21Ye cannot drink the cup of the Lord, and the cup of devils: ye cannot be partakers of the Lord's table, and of the table of devils.22Do we provoke the Lord to jealousy? are we stronger than he?23All things are lawful for me, but all things are not expedient: all things are lawful for me, but all things edify not.24Let no man seek his own, but every man another's wealth.25Whatsoever is sold in the shambles, that eat, asking no question for conscience sake:26For the earth is the Lord's, and the fulness thereof.27If any of them that believe not bid you to a feast, and ye be disposed to go; whatsoever is set before you, eat, asking no question for conscience sake.28But if any man say unto you, This is offered in sacrifice unto idols, eat not for his sake that shewed it, and for conscience sake: for the earth is the Lord's, and the fulness thereof:29Conscience, I say, not thine own, but of the other: for why is my liberty judged of another man's conscience?30For if I by grace be a partaker, why am I evil spoken of for that for which I give thanks?31Whether therefore ye eat, or drink, or whatsoever ye do, do all to the glory of God.32Give none offence, neither to the Jews, nor to the Gentiles, nor to the church of God:33Even as I please all men in all things, not seeking mine own profit, but the profit of many, that they may be saved.

The Garden of Love - Imagery, symbolism and themes

Imagery and symbolism

The garden of love - The dominant image evokes two gardens in the Old Testament. Firstly, it evokes the Garden of Eden before the Fall of humankind. When Adam and Eve were in the garden, they were able to love without shame and self-consciousness. It was a place, therefore, of innocent, uninhibited sexual expression. The state of the garden discovered by the speaker is therefore akin to Eden after the Fall, when sexuality is surrounded by shame, repression and prohibitions (see Big ideas from the Bible > Garden of Eden; Adam and Eve; Second Adam.)

The second garden is found in the Old Testament poem, the Song of Songs (sometimes called TheSong of Solomon.) This is an unashamedly erotic poem in which garden imagery is used as a metaphor for sexual enjoyment (Song of Songs 4:16, Song of Songs 5:1, Song of Songs 6:2). However, the contemporary Christian reading reinterpreted the original eroticism of the poem, to make it a symbol of a ‘purer' spiritual love, implicitly demoting the worth of sexual expression.

More on the Song of Songs: This poetic account of lovers was interpreted by the Church variously as an image of the spiritual relationship:

In medieval literature, the Song was used as an image for sexual encounter/ sexual relationship. Chaucer uses it in a parodic form in his Merchant's Tale in The Canterbury Tales.

Since it thus became a poem interpreted in ways far removed from its original purpose, the Song serves as a metaphor for Blake's vision of the way in which the religious system has replaced a celebration of the goodness of sexuality with reasons for shame and repression.

The green - This has three, inter-linked aspects

  • The colour green is associated with growth, fertility and spring
  • Village greens were places of play and freedom. They represented the importance of play, and therefore of imagination, in human life.
  • Village greens were not owned by anyone, so represented freedom from the rule or demands of an authority figure.

In the Songs of Innocence, the green is a place of play and freedom for children. It evokes a time of innocence in which ‘play' could include innocent, unselfconscious sexuality. Here it has been taken over by repressiveness.

Prison – Blake's opposition to the repression of desires as advocated by conventional Christianity meant that the Chapel seems an image of prison:

  • It is bounded by ‘gates' which are ‘shut'
  • It is a place where people are not free to act (‘Thou shalt not')
  • It is associated with the loss of life (‘graves')
  • Its priests wear uniforms (they are all ‘in black') and patrol the grounds like warders
  • They confine any initiative toward freedom (‘binding .. desires'), in a potentially painful way (using ‘briars').

Investigating imagery and symbolism

  • Compare the values represented by the green in many of the Songs of Innocence with the values that now seem to dominate the Garden.

Themes

The distortion of Christian belief about the future life

Blake attacks the approach of some forms of contemporary Christianity which encouraged the denial of sexuality and other powers in the present, in the hope of future reward and bliss. He felt that this led to permanent failure to attain human fulfilment.

The effects of ‘fallenness' on repression of sexuality and other emotions

Blake believed that inhibitions lie primarily within the mind, rather than in external factors. Society makes its fears, guilt and shame into rules and laws which are then enshrined in social institutions such as the authority of parents, the Church and the State or Monarchy.

Investigating themes

  • What new aspects of this theme are dealt with here?

A 'testament' is a covenant or binding agreement and is a term used in the Bible of God's relationship with his people). The sacred writings of Judaism (the Hebrew Bible). These also form the first part of the Christian Bible.

The place described in the Book of Genesis in the Old Testament, in which God placed his first human creatures, Adam and Eve.

Adam and Eve's act of disobedience in the Garden of Eden described in the Old Testament Book of Genesis which led to estrangement from God for them and their descendants.

According to Genesis (the first book of the Old Testament), Adam is the first human being, made in the image / likeness of God, placed in the Garden of Eden and given dominion over the earth.

According to the book of Genesis in the Bible the first woman, said to have been created by God out of Adam's rib, to be his companion.

A 'testament' is a covenant or binding agreement and is a term used in the Bible of God's relationship with his people). The sacred writings of Judaism (the Hebrew Bible). These also form the first part of the Christian Bible.

Name originally given to disciples of Jesus by outsiders and gradually adopted by the Early Church.

1. Term for a worshipping community of Christians. 2. The building in which Christians traditionally meet for worship. 3. The worldwide community of Christian believers.

Title (eventually used as name) given to Jesus, refering to an anointed person set apart for a special task such as a king.

The spirit which gives life to a human being; the part which lives on after death; a person's inner being (personality, intellect, emotions and will) which distinguishes them from animals.

The Bible describes God as the unique supreme being, creator and ruler of the universe.

Mary, the mother of Jesus and wife of Joseph. It is traditionally understood that Mary was, and remained, a virgin during both the conception and birth of Jesus.

The beliefs, doctrines and practices of Christians.

A place of Christian worship other than a parish church eg. 1. Belonging to a great house, hospital, school, prison etc. 2. An area containing an altar within a larger church or cathedral. 3. A non-conformist place of worship.

A person whose role is to carry out religious functions.

Also known as the Song of Solomon; an erotic celebration of human love; variously interpreted by Jews and Christians alike

  • English Standard Version
  • King James Version

1Behold, you are beautiful, my love, behold, you are beautiful! Your eyes are doves behind your veil. Your hair is like a flock of goats leaping down the slopes of Gilead.2Your teeth are like a flock of shorn ewes that have come up from the washing, all of which bear twins, and not one among them has lost its young.3Your lips are like a scarlet thread, and your mouth is lovely. Your cheeks are like halves of a pomegranate behind your veil.4Your neck is like the tower of David, built in rows of stone; on it hang a thousand shields, all of them shields of warriors.5Your two breasts are like two fawns, twins of a gazelle, that graze among the lilies.6Until the day breathes and the shadows flee, I will go away to the mountain of myrrh and the hill of frankincense.7You are altogether beautiful, my love; there is no flaw in you.8Come with me from Lebanon, my bride; come with me from Lebanon. Depart from the peak of Amana, from the peak of Senir and Hermon, from the dens of lions, from the mountains of leopards.9You have captivated my heart, my sister, my bride; you have captivated my heart with one glance of your eyes, with one jewel of your necklace.10How beautiful is your love, my sister, my bride! How much better is your love than wine, and the fragrance of your oils than any spice!11Your lips drip nectar, my bride; honey and milk are under your tongue; the fragrance of your garments is like the fragrance of Lebanon.12A garden locked is my sister, my bride, a spring locked, a fountain sealed.13Your shoots are an orchard of pomegranates with all choicest fruits, henna with nard,14nard and saffron, calamus and cinnamon, with all trees of frankincense, myrrh and aloes, with all choice spices - 15a garden fountain, a well of living water, and flowing streams from Lebanon.16Awake, O north wind, and come, O south wind! Blow upon my garden, let its spices flow. Together in the Garden of Love She Let my beloved come to his garden, and eat its choicest fruits.

1Behold, thou art fair, my love; behold, thou art fair; thou hast doves' eyes within thy locks: thy hair is as a flock of goats, that appear from mount Gilead.2Thy teeth are like a flock of sheep that are even shorn, which came up from the washing; whereof every one bear twins, and none is barren among them.3Thy lips are like a thread of scarlet, and thy speech is comely: thy temples are like a piece of a pomegranate within thy locks.4Thy neck is like the tower of David builded for an armoury, whereon there hang a thousand bucklers, all shields of mighty men.5Thy two breasts are like two young roes that are twins, which feed among the lilies.6Until the day break, and the shadows flee away, I will get me to the mountain of myrrh, and to the hill of frankincense.7Thou art all fair, my love; there is no spot in thee.8Come with me from Lebanon, my spouse, with me from Lebanon: look from the top of Amana, from the top of Shenir and Hermon, from the lions' dens, from the mountains of the leopards.9Thou hast ravished my heart, my sister, my spouse; thou hast ravished my heart with one of thine eyes, with one chain of thy neck.10How fair is thy love, my sister, my spouse! how much better is thy love than wine! and the smell of thine ointments than all spices!11Thy lips, O my spouse, drop as the honeycomb: honey and milk are under thy tongue; and the smell of thy garments is like the smell of Lebanon.12A garden inclosed is my sister, my spouse; a spring shut up, a fountain sealed.13Thy plants are an orchard of pomegranates, with pleasant fruits; camphire, with spikenard,14Spikenard and saffron; calamus and cinnamon, with all trees of frankincense; myrrh and aloes, with all the chief spices:15A fountain of gardens, a well of living waters, and streams from Lebanon.16Awake, O north wind; and come, thou south; blow upon my garden, that the spices thereof may flow out. Let my beloved come into his garden, and eat his pleasant fruits.

  • English Standard Version
  • King James Version

1I came to my garden, my sister, my bride, I gathered my myrrh with my spice, I ate my honeycomb with my honey, I drank my wine with my milk. Others Eat, friends, drink, and be drunk with love!2I slept, but my heart was awake. A sound! My beloved is knocking. Open to me, my sister, my love, my dove, my perfect one, for my head is wet with dew, my locks with the drops of the night.3I had put off my garment; how could I put it on? I had bathed my feet; how could I soil them?4My beloved put his hand to the latch, and my heart was thrilled within me.5I arose to open to my beloved, and my hands dripped with myrrh, my fingers with liquid myrrh, on the handles of the bolt.6I opened to my beloved, but my beloved had turned and gone. My soul failed me when he spoke. I sought him, but found him not; I called him, but he gave no answer.7The watchmen found me as they went about in the city; they beat me, they bruised me, they took away my veil, those watchmen of the walls.8I adjure you, O daughters of Jerusalem, if you find my beloved, that you tell him I am sick with love.9What is your beloved more than another beloved, O most beautiful among women? What is your beloved more than another beloved, that you thus adjure us?10My beloved is radiant and ruddy, distinguished among ten thousand.11His head is the finest gold; his locks are wavy, black as a raven.12His eyes are like doves beside streams of water, bathed in milk, sitting beside a full pool.13His cheeks are like beds of spices, mounds of sweet-smelling herbs. His lips are lilies, dripping liquid myrrh.14His arms are rods of gold, set with jewels. His body is polished ivory, bedecked with sapphires.15His legs are alabaster columns, set on bases of gold. His appearance is like Lebanon, choice as the cedars.16His mouth is most sweet, and he is altogether desirable. This is my beloved and this is my friend, O daughters of Jerusalem.

1I am come into my garden, my sister, my spouse: I have gathered my myrrh with my spice; I have eaten my honeycomb with my honey; I have drunk my wine with my milk: eat, O friends; drink, yea, drink abundantly, O beloved.2I sleep, but my heart waketh: it is the voice of my beloved that knocketh, saying, Open to me, my sister, my love, my dove, my undefiled: for my head is filled with dew, and my locks with the drops of the night.3I have put off my coat; how shall I put it on? I have washed my feet; how shall I defile them?4My beloved put in his hand by the hole of the door, and my bowels were moved for him.5I rose up to open to my beloved; and my hands dropped with myrrh, and my fingers with sweet smelling myrrh, upon the handles of the lock.6I opened to my beloved; but my beloved had withdrawn himself, and was gone: my soul failed when he spake: I sought him, but I could not find him; I called him, but he gave me no answer.7The watchmen that went about the city found me, they smote me, they wounded me; the keepers of the walls took away my veil from me.8I charge you, O daughters of Jerusalem, if ye find my beloved, that ye tell him, that I am sick of love.9What is thy beloved more than another beloved, O thou fairest among women? what is thy beloved more than another beloved, that thou dost so charge us?10My beloved is white and ruddy, the chiefest among ten thousand.11His head is as the most fine gold, his locks are bushy, and black as a raven.12His eyes are as the eyes of doves by the rivers of waters, washed with milk, and fitly set.13His cheeks are as a bed of spices, as sweet flowers: his lips like lilies, dropping sweet smelling myrrh.14His hands are as gold rings set with the beryl: his belly is as bright ivory overlaid with sapphires.15His legs are as pillars of marble, set upon sockets of fine gold: his countenance is as Lebanon, excellent as the cedars.16His mouth is most sweet: yea, he is altogether lovely. This is my beloved, and this is my friend, O daughters of Jerusalem.

  • English Standard Version
  • King James Version

1Where has your beloved gone, O most beautiful among women? Where has your beloved turned, that we may seek him with you?2My beloved has gone down to his garden to the beds of spices, to graze in the gardens and to gather lilies.3I am my beloved's and my beloved is mine; he grazes among the lilies.4You are beautiful as Tirzah, my love, lovely as Jerusalem, awesome as an army with banners.5Turn away your eyes from me, for they overwhelm me - Your hair is like a flock of goats leaping down the slopes of Gilead.6Your teeth are like a flock of ewes that have come up from the washing; all of them bear twins; not one among them has lost its young.7Your cheeks are like halves of a pomegranate behind your veil.8There are sixty queens and eighty concubines, and virgins without number.9My dove, my perfect one, is the only one, the only one of her mother, pure to her who bore her. The young women saw her and called her blessed; the queens and concubines also, and they praised her.10Who is this who looks down like the dawn, beautiful as the moon, bright as the sun, awesome as an army with banners?11I went down to the nut orchard to look at the blossoms of the valley, to see whether the vines had budded, whether the pomegranates were in bloom.12Before I was aware, my desire set me among the chariots of my kinsman, a prince.13Return, return, O Shulammite, return, return, that we may look upon you. He Why should you look upon the Shulammite, as upon a dance before two armies?

1Whither is thy beloved gone, O thou fairest among women? whither is thy beloved turned aside? that we may seek him with thee.2My beloved is gone down into his garden, to the beds of spices, to feed in the gardens, and to gather lilies.3I am my beloved's, and my beloved is mine: he feedeth among the lilies.4Thou art beautiful, O my love, as Tirzah, comely as Jerusalem, terrible as an army with banners.5Turn away thine eyes from me, for they have overcome me: thy hair is as a flock of goats that appear from Gilead.6Thy teeth are as a flock of sheep which go up from the washing, whereof every one beareth twins, and there is not one barren among them.7As a piece of a pomegranate are thy temples within thy locks.8There are threescore queens, and fourscore concubines, and virgins without number.9My dove, my undefiled is but one; she is the only one of her mother, she is the choice one of her that bare her. The daughters saw her, and blessed her; yea, the queens and the concubines, and they praised her.10Who is she that looketh forth as the morning, fair as the moon, clear as the sun, and terrible as an army with banners?11I went down into the garden of nuts to see the fruits of the valley, and to see whether the vine flourished and the pomegranates budded.12Or ever I was aware, my soul made me like the chariots of Amminadib.13Return, return, O Shulamite; return, return, that we may look upon thee. What will ye see in the Shulamite? As it were the company of two armies.

0 thoughts on “The Garden Of Love Essay For Her

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *